Hawaiian Studies

K. Ka‘eo

Program Learning Outcomes

  1. Professional actions are based on core nursing values, professional standards of practice, and the law
  2. Develops insight through reflective practice, self-analysis, and self care.
  3. Engages in ongoing self-directed learning and provides care based on evidence supported by research.
  4. Demonstrates leadership in nursing and health care.
  5. Collaborates as part of a health care team.
  6. Practices within, utilizes, and contributes to the broader health care system.
  7. Practices patient-centered care.
  8. Communicates effectively
  9. Demonstrates clinical judgment/critical thinking in the delivery of care of patients while maintaining safety.

Degrees and Certificates

Classes

BOT 105/HWST 211 : Ethnobotany

Identifies endemic, indigenous, and Polynesian introduced flora of Hawai‘i. Examines the many uses of Hawai‘i’s flora by the indigenous people. Reveals the relationship of gods/plants/man, and connects belief and practices with the intentional migration of specific plants. Meets Social Science requirement, not Natural Science requirement.

Credits

3

HWST/MUS 176 : History and Development of Hawaiian Music

Focuses on the history and development of traditional and acculturated vocal and instrumental Hawaiian music. Discusses Hawaiian dance genres related to the music. Examines Hawaiian music and dance as an organization of sound and movement and as a product of culture and people. Uses sound recordings, video presentations, and live performances of the various music genres discussed.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HAW 101 and HWST 107, both with a grade C or better, or consent.

HWST 107 : Hawai‘i: Center of the Pacific

Introduces the unique aspects of Hawai‘i and Hawaiian culture in relation to the larger Pacific, including geography, origins, language, religion, land, art, and history.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENG 22 with grade C or better, or placement at ENG 100, or consent.

HWST 111 : The Hawaiian ‘Ohana

Examines culture of Hawaiian people as expressed in home and family. Provides understanding of the family as the basis of larger Hawaiian society. Compares and contrasts both ancient and modern aspects of the Hawaiian family. Uses Hawaiian terminology.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HWST 107 with grade C or better, or consent.

HWST 132 : Hula ‘Ōlapa (Foundational Hawaiian Dance)

Studies foundational hula and chant from pre-contact, post-contact, Monarchy era and contemporary Hawai’i. Students will be introduced to hula instruments, costuming and adornments, the kuahu hula and beginning choreography.

Credits

2

Prerequisites

HAW104 with grade C or better, or instructor consent.

HWST 207 : Mālama Ahupua‘a: Resource Management

Examines the ahupua‘a system: its mythologies, place names, history, poetry, and early documents of the Hawaiian nation as it was conceptualized by the ancient Hawaiians. Explores the relevance of the ahupua‘a system in modern society.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HWST 107 with grade C or better, or consent.

HWST 211L : Hawaiian Ethnobotany Lab

Studies the interactions between the Hawaiian culture and plants/plant environments. Considers different levels and types of interactions and patterns of interactions between people and plants. Places emphasis on the importance of cultural upbringing. Includes field trips in lieu of lab. (Crosslisted as BOT 105L.)

Credits

1

Prerequisites

HWST 211 or BOT 105, either with a C or better (or concurrent).

HWST 213 : Hawaiian Ethnozoology

Surveys and identifies Hawaiian fishes, birds, and other creatures, and their place in Hawaiian culture. Explores traditional methods of capture, practical uses, and conservation techniques. Uses Hawaiian terminology.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HAW 101, or consent.

HWST 222 : Maʻawe: Hawaiian Fiber Arts

Examines Hawaiian cultural fiber arts. Develops advanced fiber arts projects of Hawaiian cultural significance or ceremonial use. Practices proper protocols used in the procurement of materials needed to complete various fiber arts projects. Explores related protocol and methods for gathering, Native Hawaiian gathering rights, and the type of environments in which specific materials grow and can be gathered. (May be repeated for unlimited credit.)

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HWST 211 or BOT 105, either with grade B or better, or consent.

HWST 231 : Native Perspectives on Hawaiian Culture

Explores Native Hawaiian culture from traditional times to present. Examines values, social relationships, religion, traditional practices and arts.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HWST 101, or HWST 100BCD, or HWST 107, any with grade C or better, or consent.

HWST 262 : Pana Maui: Maui’s Sacred Hawaiian Places

Examines the sacred Hawaiian places of Maui, including accounts of mythical heroes, heiau, fishponds, wind and rain names, and their metaphoric value to ancient and modern Hawaiian culture. Uses Hawaiian terminology.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HWST 107 or 111 or 270; and HAW 102; or consent.

HWST 270 : Hawaiian Mythology

Surveys the gods, ‘aumākua, kūpua, mythical heroes, heroines, and their kinolau as the basis of traditional Hawaiian metaphor.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HWST 107 or HAW 102, or consent.

HWST 286 : Kahoʻolawe: Aloha ‘Āina

Develops and expands students’ consciousness towards Kaho‘olawe and the practice of Aloha ‘Āina. Employs a native Hawaiian worldview in studying the cultural history of Kaho‘olawe. Provides hands-on opportunities to practice Aloha ‘Āina. Empowers students to become stewards and participate in the protection, restoration, and revitalization of Hawai‘i Nei. Requires access and volunteer work on Kaho‘olawe.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HWST 107 or 231, either with grade C or better, or consent

HWST 291 : Modern Issues in Hawai‘i

Introduces contemporary, domestic and international Hawaiian issues within historical, social, cultural and political contexts. Engages students in research, question, critique, and development of their own critical analysis and commentary on diverse issues.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HWST 107 and ENG 100, both with grade C or better, or consent.